Walter “Wolfman” Washington: Blues from New Orleans

Ahead of his India debut, the American bluesman looks back on his eventful career.

Walter “Wolfman” Washington is a musician of unparalleled versatility. The American blues vocalist-guitarist’s roots might be in the blues—he’s been performing it for over half a century—but in the past three decades, he has also whipped up some wholesome funk and R&B. It can be heard best on his 1997 record, Blue Moon Risin’.

It is but only natural for Washington to glide between different styles of music effortlessly—he grew up in New Orleans within a family that breathed music. “It was all around me. My whole family was involved in music, including two of my uncles, [the veteran guitarists] Guitar Slim [Eddie Jones] and Lightnin’ Slim [Otis Verries Hicks].”

Next month, Washington will perform for the first time in India, at the Mahindra Blues Festival. “We want to share some of our special brand of New Orleans music with the people,” says the 74-year-old, who started his career as a teenager, playing with pop and R&B singer Lee Dorsey’s group.

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New Orleans Cigar Box Guitar Fest 2018

The latest Blues Center video offers a cigar box guitar primer. It covers the 2018 New Orleans Cigar Box Festival with an interview of founder Collins Kirby and live clips from Samantha Fish, Little Freddie King, Steve Arvey, April Mae & The June Bugs and Ivor Simpson Kennedy. Find out more about Bo Diddley, the premiere cigar box player of all time. Little Freddie and Bo Diddley are both from McComb, MS.

Blues Center Trailer – Peter Case talks Bruce Springsteen

Introducing the Blues Center! Ric Stewart previews the channel and BCI #9 with Peter Case. Bruce Springsteen praised Peter Case’s work in Rolling Stone Magazine and took the time to meet him as he toured New Jersey. Ric interviewed Peter in 1996 and includes some of that footage to illustrate an hilarious story about meeting the Boss.

This video made possible in part by a Community Partnership grant from the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation.

Mason Ruffner – Blues Center Interview #6

Mason Ruffner sizzles on guitar in BCI #6. He talks about cutting “Series of Dreams” with Bob Dylan, jamming with Jimmy Page and his ongoing live collaboration with Carlos Santana. Subscribe to the catch the entire BCI series.


The Eddie Hinton Story – Will a troubled Southern R&B genius finally get his due?

He should have been a superstar along the lines of Eric Clapton. Or John Mayer. Someone like that. As gifted as he was as a soul singer, songwriter, guitarist and producer, Hinton should have been rich and famous instead of a tragic cult hero who died broke and broken, known mostly only to hardcore Southern R&B obsessives, a man whose best recordings aren’t even in print right now.

But that’s how the hand of fate works sometimes.

After moving to Muscle Shoals, Hinton played guitar on Staple Singers, Boz Scaggs, Waylon Jennings, Mavis Staples, Toots Hibbert and Jimmy Cliff records. His playing is featured prominently on the Aretha Franklin LP “This Girl’s in Love with You.” And “3614 Jackson Highway,” the underrated covers album Cher made at Muscle Shoals Sound, bearing that Sheffield studio’s now famous address.


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Stanton Moore in Blues Center Interview #4

Stanton Moore drops by Pinecohn Studios to talk blues and how he joined the New Orleans Klezmer Allstars and Galactic. A very busy drummer, Stanton plays regularly with Charlie Hunter, Will Bernard and Tom Morello. Episode #4 features footage Ric Stewart shot in 1996 of Stanton with the Klezmers, a band he still joins! Rare candid moments of his Stanton Moore Trio are also included. Stanton talks about heavy metal, the source of his dynamic attack and great shows in BCI#4. Subscribe to the Blues Center’s YouTube Channel

Little Freddie King – Blues Center Interview #3

Little Freddie King sits down with Ric Stewart to discuss his brand of New Orleans blues. The native of McComb, MS is a cousin of Lightning Hopkins who migrated to the crescent city at age 14. After working dockside to pay the bills, LFK cut some highly prized blues recordings over 40 years ago and has continued with a healthy slate of shows and albums over the last decade.